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Shelley Argabrite
Ultimate Health Planner
Joined: 5 months  ago
Posts: 155
01/11/2016 12:54 am  

First, we decide what issues are most important.

When we open up to each other, lots of good things happen.  We get real-time feedback, share ideas and address everyday needs, big and small.  Whatever’s on your mind, let’s talk. 

Let's think about everything we need to consider under the TOPIC 

Chronic Diseases and their common risk factors (lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, tobacco use

 

In 60 seconds list as many things as you can relating to the this topic.  Some examples are: affordable healthy food options, cessation classes, easy & quick recipes, CARC, cancer screenings, help with insurance, walking, etc...

 

Open the reply box and set your timer! 

 

1, 2, 3 GO!

 

 

Edited: 4 months  ago

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Steve Putnam
Active Planning Partner Level 5
Joined: 4 months  ago
Posts: 48
03/11/2016 6:32 am  

Lack of activity

eating habits

modifiable risk factors not being addressed

life has become to easy/convenient

60 seconds  stop 


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Steve Putnam
Active Planning Partner Level 5
Joined: 4 months  ago
Posts: 48
03/11/2016 6:02 pm  

According to the CDC, chronic diseases are responsible for 7 out of 10 deaths each year, and treating people with chronic diseases account for 86% of our nation's health care costs.  Cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes are some of the major chronic diseases that account for these data points.  In far too many cases, modifiable risk factors are a major component of these diseases.  Tobacco use, sedentary lifestyle, and poor nutrition are three modifiable risk factors that have a significant impact on chronic disease.  As health care costs continue to rise, treatment of chronic disease is not the long term answer.  Preventive care and education of the population to the benefits of prevention will have a far greater impact, at a much lower cost.  The following link to the CDC will provide great detail on this topic.  

http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/pdf/2009-power-of-prevention.pdf

Please remember one life changed equals one life saved.  


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Rodney Glotfelty
New Planning Partner
Joined: 4 months  ago
Posts: 4
04/11/2016 11:31 am  

Affordable access to healthy fruits and vegetables

Promotion of outdoor trails for physical activity

Safe bicycle lanes on County Roads

More health food options on menus

Promotion of screenings for hypertension, blood sugar, etc.  


Sandy Miller
Active Planning Partner Level 5
Joined: 4 months  ago
Posts: 36
04/11/2016 2:16 pm  

community walking clubs, more nutritious menu options,  sedentary lifestyle due to desk jobs (increase exercise breaks in the workplace), affordable healthy food options at sport events, education programs for children, youth and families, promotion of the Eight Dimensions of Wellness


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Shelley Argabrite
Ultimate Health Planner
Joined: 5 months  ago
Posts: 155
09/11/2016 9:33 pm  

How are we doing?  Check out the Leading health indicators from Healthy People 2020

https://www.healthypeople.gov/sites/default/files/HP2020_LHI_Nut_PhysActiv_0.pdf


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Shelley Argabrite
Ultimate Health Planner
Joined: 5 months  ago
Posts: 155
09/11/2016 9:56 pm  

Let's turn our attention to the data!  We know obesity continues to be a problem with our youth.  Our county obesity rates are increasing.  This is consistent with National trends.  When we begin thinking about how to slow this trend down, it's vital to look at our poverty rates.  Let's face it, eating healthy costs more!  Our poverty rates are quite high compared to other counties in MD. There are organizations that pack lunches for kids over the weekend and during the summer because some kids don't have enough food.   How many kids are going hungry in Garrett County?  How do we begin tracking that information?  

 


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HEATHER BERG
Active Planning Partner Level 5
Joined: 4 months  ago
Posts: 30
10/11/2016 8:36 am  

Shelley, I have seen what goes into these packed lunches for the kids over the weekend, and most of the food that is in the bag is junk food. I think it is okay to pack this kind of bag lunch, but I also think that there should be some healthy food in there, especially for the children who aren't getting the right nutrition in the first place. I would also like to say that the they lunch service that the board of education provides over the summer for most towns in Garrett County is an AWESOME program. I think I got a little off track with your question, and do you know if these organizations track how many bag lunches they give out to children over the weekend in the county? 


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Shelley Argabrite
Ultimate Health Planner
Joined: 5 months  ago
Posts: 155
14/11/2016 12:33 pm  

Heather, thank you for sharing your concerns about nutritious food.  Your concerns are shared by many! Scott Germain is the person to speak with about this particular issue.  He runs the Food & Nutrition Service for Garrett County Public Schools. The USDA and MD legislature does mandate what's on the plate!  However, there is no guideline for grams of sugar.  This may be an area we want to look at as a community.  I did hear that they are going to try and offer food on Snow Days at certain locations in addition to the summer program.  I think that the backpack program is from local churches and other partners...but I'm not positive.  Does anyone know?  Let's start a discussion... 


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Shelley Argabrite
Ultimate Health Planner
Joined: 5 months  ago
Posts: 155
14/11/2016 3:21 pm  
  It's in the Bag ministries, check it out here   http://northerngarrettumparish.com/outreach_ministries.html   
 
Venessa Stacy, Coordinator of Special Programs II, Partners After School @ Accident, Developmental Assets and A STAR! AmeriCorps at GCHD found the answer for us!   Vensessa is a little harder to track down because she is so active in the community!   This is a great opportunity for those looking to volunteer!!
 

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Pam Hageman
New Planning Partner
Joined: 4 months  ago
Posts: 3
02/12/2016 2:46 pm  

For seniors managing a chronic condition in our community there are exercise programs, fitness classes, nutrition education, and healthy meals available at local senior centers and nutrition sites throughout the county. There are chronic disease self management groups meeting in the county. Those are just a few of the programs offered through Community Action Aging and Nutrition targeting seniors. There are many resources and agencies that would love to partner with those struggling with chronic conditions. Perhaps some of those other agencies and resources can chime in with resource they have to live the healthiest life possible with a chronic condition.

Edited: 3 months  ago

Yolanda Michelle Harman
New Planning Partner
Joined: 2 months  ago
Posts: 1
20/12/2016 1:49 pm  

Support for diabetics

Perks from area gyms and recreational sites for full time residents

More physical family activities or organized out of school teams

Info on healthy eating at reasonable costs

Affordable sports and activities for families

 

 


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Linda Costello
Planning Partner Superstar!
Joined: 4 months  ago
Posts: 70
07/01/2017 11:00 pm  

I am working with a business and their wellness committee that is wanting to participate in a walk/run when spring comes. Can anyone get me people to contact or tell me ones that is scheduled. Be nice if there was some local. That way more of their employees will participate. They have said they will help pay if there is a charge for their employees to register

Thanks

 

 


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Bob Stephens
Active Planning Partner Level 3
Joined: 4 months  ago
Posts: 17
18/01/2017 9:42 am  

A new CDC study demonstrates that Americans living in rural areas are more likely to die from five leading causes than their urban counterparts.

In 2014, many deaths among rural Americans were potentially preventable, including 25,000 from heart disease, 19,000 from cancer, 12,000 from unintentional injuries, 11,000 from chronic lower respiratory disease and 4,000 from stroke. The percentages of deaths that were potentially preventable were higher in rural areas than in urban areas.

Some 46 million Americans — 15 percent of the U.S. population — currently live in rural areas. Several demographic, environmental, economic and social factors might put rural residents at higher risk of death from these public health conditions. Residents of rural areas in the United States tend to be older and sicker than their urban counterparts. They have higher rates of cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, and obesity. Rural residents report less leisure-time physical activity and lower seatbelt use than their urban counterparts. They also have higher rates of poverty, less access to healthcare, and are less likely to have health insurance.

 

For more information, see the link below.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/ss/ss6601a1.htm?s_cid=ss6601a1_w#F5_down


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Kelly Rock
Active Planning Partner
Joined: 1 month  ago
Posts: 5
19/01/2017 7:05 pm  

The contributors to overweight and obesity are varied and numerous.  It is truly a complex problem with no one magic solution.  Contributing factors include, but are not limited to:  food production practices, government regulation (or non-regulation) of food/agricultural issues, routine addition of sugar into food products, sedentary lifestyle of western cultures, fast food products, hectic on-the-go society, and lack of 'free time' to engage in physical activity.  Those factors have not just contributed to overweight and obesity, but also to the dramatic increase in type II diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), and other metabolic disorders.

I have struggled with weight management all of my life.  It takes time, money, and a great deal of effort to manage these issues on a day to day basis.  I am blessed to have a foundation of health literacy, a strong desire for health, support from my family, the ability to purchase healthy food, and scheduled time to prepare healthy meals on a pretty regular basis.  Many people do not.  

Working together as a community on this issue is the only means by which we can address it.  It's not just looking at one individual and the choices that they make.  It really does take a village to address all of the many layers of this problem!


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